You know one of the reasons why Barnabas makes such a great hero?  It’s because he’s got so much blood on his hands.  At any point, he can stop playing by the rules.  If he got away with it when he had no real moral footing, just imagine what he can do when he’s in the right.  Just as often as take action, however, one of his great traits is that he inspires others to take action.  Perhaps to help him.  Perhaps by example.  There are times when the writers try to shoehorn this in a bit awkwardly… especially in the beginning.

The big turning point I identified for Barnabas is when he stops Nicholas from repeating Lang’s experiment.  It’s the most dynamic we’ve seen him be, and it represents a true, moral point of no return.  Amazing to se a villain have such a turn by lose none of his ruthlessness.

I’ve been giving the Barnabas/Angelique story — the rock-solid core of the Dark Shadows mythos — non-stop analysis.

I don’t want to fritter it away on a mere log entry.  It could honestly merit its  own web page, if not a book.  I will  say that it is the ultimate American story.  One of the show’s hidden merits is that it shows the transition from European culture to American culture.

Similarly, if we take death out of it (how boring), who shows the greater character to be Misress of Collinwood and the future of the Collins dynasty?  Josette?  1841 PT exists partially to show upstage how that turns out.  Fragile Carolyn? Obsessive Elizabeth? Hardly.  I don’t need to spell out where I’m going with all of this.

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